Bible Study

Don’t just take our word for it . . . take His! We would encourage you to spend time examining the following Scriptures that shaped this sermon: Acts 1:15–26; John 17:11–19

Sermon Outline

  • “Today, if ye hear His voice”
  • Human wisdom
    • What the best of human wisdom has gotten right
    • Where the best of human wisdom has fallen short
    • Illustration: The hill and the city
  • Judas
    • Acts 1:17 — Judas clings to the land (compare Deuteronomy 18)
    • Acts 1:24 — Jesus Christ is the “knower of hearts”
  • Leaving the hill, attaining the city

Sermon Questions

  1. How was it decided that Judas should be replaced?
  2. Why were those disciples who were later martyred (like James: Acts 12:2) not replaced?
  3. What are the qualifications for apostleship that Peter underscores? What does this suggest about the priorities of the early church?
  4. Why is it inappropriate for Christians to draw lots today? In this context, how are the lots symbolic (see Numbers 25:55–56, 33:54, 34:13, 36:2–3, etc.)? How are they provisional (compare John 16:13; Acts 2, 13:2–3)?
  5. Why is it significant that Judas “acquired a field” (Acts 1:18)? What does that tell us about Judas?
  6. The disciples call Jesus “Lord, knower of hearts” (kyrie kardiagnōsta). How does it sit with you that Jesus Christ knows your heart?
  7. How is the Holy Spirit challenging or warning you today?
  8. What promises of God has this scripture driven home to you?
  9. Would your life look different if human wisdom was all you had? Would anything be missing? What?

Resources Consulted

  • John R.W. Stott, The Message of Acts (IVP)
  • Craig S. Keener, Acts: An Exegetical Commentary (Baker)
  • Augustine, Confessions 7.21.27 (see “Chapter 21”)
  • CS Lewis, “Transposition,” in The Weight of Glory
  • GK Chesterton, “The Priest of Spring,” in A Miscellany of Men

Questions?

Do you have a question about today’s sermon? Email Sam Fornecker (sfornecker@standrews.church).

Audio & Video

You can listen to the sermon by using the player below or via the St Andrew’s Sermon Podcast on iTunes and Spotify.